Neuro Book Review #4 by Sruthi Ramaraju

Posted on May 16, 2017

Today, we’re joined by Sruthi Ramaraju again, this time with her wonderful review on Anatomy of an Epidemic by Robert Whitaker. Sruthi placed in the top 5 at the 2017 English Brain Bee, a national neuroscience competition for secondary school students in England. She loves to read medical literature and enjoys writing fiction and non-fiction. If […]

Neuro Book Review #3 by Sruthi Ramaraju

Posted on Apr 28, 2017

Welcome back to the Synapse Project Book Review Series! Today, we’re joined with Sruthi Ramaraju, and her beautiful review on Henry Marsh’s Do No Harm, a book about one of the top neurosurgeons in Britain. Sruthi placed in the top 5 at the 2017 English Brain Bee, a national neuroscience competition for secondary school students in England. She loves to read […]

Neuro Book Review #2 by Jane Doherty

Posted on Apr 14, 2017

Hi everyone! Welcome back to the Synapse Project Book Review Series! Today, we’re joined with Jane Doherty, writing elegantly about Louann Brizendine’s The Female Brain. Jane is also a passionate speaker at the GSTEM conference and is very enthusiastic about the empowerment of curious minds and female engagement in neuroscience fields. If you are interested in contributing […]

Neuro Book Review #1 by Tara Pattilachan

Posted on Jan 22, 2017

Books. Books. Books. They are one of the most indulging ways to learn, to explore, to reflect. This post is the first of our Neuro Book Review Series, through which we hope to share with you some gripping literature about the brain. Today, we’re joined with Tara Menon Pattilachan, writer of her beautiful blog, Neurologic. In this […]

Brain Bee Interview – Ana Ghenciulescu

Posted on Oct 30, 2016

The International Brain Bee (IBB) is the one and only neuroscience competition for 14-18 year-old students around the world. Currently, about 50,000 students from more than 50 nations participate each year, with more than 600 neuroscientists involved in organizing and judging. Back in July, I participated in the IBB as the English National Champion and […]

Brain Bee Interview – Jeremi Chabros

Posted on Aug 6, 2016

The International Brain Bee (IBB) is the one and only neuroscience competition for 14-18 year-old students around the world. Currently, about 50,000 students from more than 50 nations participate each year, with more than 600 neuroscientists involved in organising and judging. Back in July, I participated in the IBB as the English National Champion and […]

The Siena Project

Posted on Apr 18, 2016
The Siena Project

Forming Synapses: Teaching Neuroscience to High School Students Georgetown University researchers bring neuroscience to students with learning difficulties. By Gabrielle-Ann Torre At the Center for the Study of Learning (CSL) at Georgetown University, Dr. Guinevere Eden and her research team investigate the neural bases of typical and atypical reading development using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). […]

AspenBrainLab – Explore Your Brain!

Posted on Dec 1, 2014

This year’s AspenBrainLab featured eminent speakers discussing epigenetics and the role life choices can play in altering gene expression. Find all the lectures on the AspenBrainLab website.

Addressing the MOOC Gender Gap

Posted on Sep 22, 2014
Addressing the MOOC Gender Gap

Photo by Chagin/Thinkstock Research shows that girls interested in science classes are influenced by factors such as how many other females are present in the classroom. The MOOC Gender Gap

The Synapse Project is “Inspiring the Future of Neuroscience!”

Posted on Jul 21, 2014
The Synapse Project is “Inspiring the Future of Neuroscience!”

          The Synapse Project was featured by the prestigious New York Academy of Sciences in one of their ‘Science and the City’ podcasts! Listen to the founder of The Synapse Project, Grace Greenwald, discuss how she is working to ‘inspire the future of neuroscience!’ The Synapse Project: Inspiring the Future of Neuroscience

Introducing the New Field of Bioelectronics

Posted on May 29, 2014

          Comparing the nervous system to a computer: can it be ‘hacked’ to induce healthy change? The New York Times features an article on the up and coming new field of Bioelectronics. The New York Times: Can the Nervous System be Hacked?

Women in Neuroscience: A Call to Action

Posted on Apr 30, 2014
Women in Neuroscience: A Call to Action

              A message from the President of the Society for Neuroscience on the current state of gender bias in her field. Message from the President: Women in Neuroscience: A Call to Action

The Synapse Project Featured in the Denver Post!

Posted on Mar 7, 2014

An article about The Synapse Project’s Virtual Field Trips in the Denver Post!

A Video Game that Trains Computers to Map the Brain

Posted on Jan 24, 2014
A Video Game that Trains Computers to Map the Brain

It’s citizen science at its best: in an effort to create a connectome of all the neurons and their connections in the retina, scientists at MIT created a video game-like overlay to get ordinary people to help them undertake the massive task. So far more than 70,000 people have furthered neuroscience by playing Eyewire! Article […]

The Weird Way Women Downplay Their Success

Posted on Jan 14, 2014
The Weird Way Women Downplay Their Success

This video from DiscoveryNews.com demonstrates that something as simple as a woman’s speech pattern can set her apart from her male counterparts in important, and potentially detrimental, ways.

Why Are There Still so Few Women in Science?

Posted on Jan 3, 2014
Why Are There Still so Few Women in Science?

An intriguing article written by a woman who has experienced first-hand how difficult it is to be a female in a male-dominated field. New York Times

The New Science of Mind

Posted on Sep 9, 2013
The New Science of Mind

Helen Mayberg featured in the New York Times!

A New Trend in Education: MOOCs

Posted on Jul 11, 2013
A New Trend in Education: MOOCs

MOOC: Massive Online Open Courses Hundreds of universities have begun to offer their courses free of charge in an online setting. In doing this, they have exponentially increased the number of people benefitting from their schools. There is an incredible variety of courses taught by esteemed professors. Classes can be interactive, and require presentations and conference calls […]

The Origin of Violence in the Brain

Posted on Jul 2, 2013
The Origin of Violence in the Brain

“Human behavior is determined by a combination of genetic and environmental influences governing brain structure and function. Violence, therefore, ultimately derives from the operations of the brain, and recognizing the importance of neurobiology will inform and invigorate study of this urgent problem.” -The Scientist.   The following articles share two different, interesting insights about how […]

Gender Gaps

Posted on Jul 2, 2013
Gender Gaps

Scientific American Magazine tries to uncover why more women withdraw from science than men. Access charts and a more in-depth article through the link below and by logging in to scientificamerican.com. >>link